Saturday, February 24, 2018

When There Isn't A Clear Answer: Thoughts on Seven Common Career Dilemmas

When There Isn't A Clear Answer

We've all faced a dilemma, two choices that appear equally good...or equally bad.
We may try to think or research our way into clarity, yet the right choice remains unclear.

As a career coach, I’ve certainly seen that regarding career decisions. Alas, often the best that can be done is to lay out the pros and cons and then, as the old saying goes, ya pays yer money; ya takes ya chances.

My PsychologyToday.com article today lays out pros and cons of some common career dilemmas.

Friday, February 23, 2018

When There Aren't Enough Good Jobs to Go Around

Most routine and moderate-judgment jobs will be automated. Many high-judgment jobs will require exceptional reasoning ability and technical skills. That means that hundreds of millions of Americans, not mention the billions worldwide, won't sustainably earn enough income.

Most of them will live very modestly, perhaps relying on a Guaranteed Basic Income. But even if they are thus financially supported, they will lack the satisfaction of a job: being productive, needed, appreciated. The obvious sequelae are depression, anger,  crime, and drug abuse. Is there a way to avoid all that?

My PsychologyToday.com article today offers a proposal. Your agreement, amplification, disagreement, and alternate proposals are welcome.

When There's Not Enough Good Work to Go Around

Thursday, February 22, 2018

"How Did You Build Such a Successful Practice?"

Today, a fellow counselor phoned and asked me, "How did you build such a successful practice?" After I answered, he encouraged me to put it in writing, so I did so as my PsychologyToday.com article today.


Wednesday, February 21, 2018

The Case For and Against Striving

The Case For and Against Striving

From childhood, we’ve been urged to strive, to live up to our potential.
Too, a counterargument is often made—for work-life balance. The claim is that it’s healthier and certainly it's more family-friendly.

But rarely is an argument made for doing the minimum, the least you can get away with. Yet a perhaps not-foolish argument can be made for that.

So in my PsychologyToday.com article today, I make the argument for maximum striving and then for minimum. Sure, it’s possible that you’ll come away opting for the golden mean but perhaps not.